shout-out to calca

A man makes a smug expression, lifts his eyebrows, and nods

On my last homework, I started using Calca rather than a vanilla calculator. It’s nice to have the calculation history through a problem; I mean, most scientific calculators don’t have a “tape” you can look back on easily.

This morning I learned that Calca knows the quadratic formula, which is nice when I’m dealing with ugly equations I need to find the roots of.

Linear regression models

I’m studying linear regression (and time series analysis) this term, so naturally the graphics will feature these topics. As always, these are licensed via Creative Commons for non-commercial use.

6 steps to a linear regression model
1. Identify outliers
2. Find multicollinearity
3. Find and assess models
4. Assess predictive power of the models
5. Analyze residuals
6. Write the report
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6 steps to a linear regression model by Heather Rollins is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

statistics is beautiful #6

Last semester, in my Statistical Modeling class, we studied a whole pile of hypothesis tests and confidence intervals.  After a few, I realized that they all took a very similar form.  The note-taking sheet below (PDF download here) lays out blocks for left-tailed test, right-tailed test, two-tailed test, and the confidence interval, with spaces to fill in the parts of the  hypothesis test as described in an earlier stats is beautiful post.

As always, this page is Creative Commons licensed, asking for attribution to Heather Rollins or to this blog’s URL for non-commercial use.  For commercial use, send me an email first. Thank you, and enjoy!

hypothesis-test-note-taking-sheet

mathematics is beautiful #4: chronic pain

Tonight’s infographic is all about chronic pain. Note the visualization in the center, where only one little person out of more than 7,300 is highlighted, and compare it to the visualization above it, where it shows one person out of three. For every person who dies due to an overdose of opioid pain medications, another 3,029 Americans are suffering from chronic pain.

Those 3,029 people have to give a urine sample each time they need to see their pain management specialist. When they experience excruciating breakthrough pain, they are turned away at the emergency room as drug-seekers. Most of their doctors don’t know how to help them, and so these patients come to believe at least once in their journey that their pain and disability are their own fault. We need to change this conversation.

chronic-pain-infographic.png

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

mathematics is beautiful #3

Just a silly one that was shared with me… I can’t take credit for it, but it made me laugh out loud.

15622152_1215753485156684_4773243829391813699_n

mathematics is beautiful #2: christmas numbers

christmas-numbers.png

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.